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Indiana Drug Card Media Center


“Medicare and the Indiana Drug Card”

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Action Lines - Medicare and the Indiana Drug Card

Action Lines - Medicare and the Indiana Drug Card As more and more baby boomers are hitting the retirement age of 65, many things need to be evaluated and one of the major decisions a person should make when entering their senior years is their medical coverage options. For those approaching age 65, taking the time to review the types of coverage you have available to you and weighing the over-all financial impact of those options will help you and your spouse plan as you move into the next stage of your life. Many unexpected costs that arise during retirement are due to unexpected medical procedures and high price prescriptions.

Many people that are approaching their Medicare years are often under the misconception that Medicare is going to cover all medical expenses but unfortunately that is not true. Medicare does not cover all medical costs and the out-of-pocket expenses for medical care can still have sticker shock effect. According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute???s October 2014 Executive Summary, ???In 2011 Medicare covered 62% of the cost of health care services for Medicare beneficiaries 65 and older, while out-of-pocket spending accounted for 13%, and private insurance covered 15%. Medicare was never designed to cover expenses in full.??

One part of Medicare that is often responsible for large out-of-pocket costs is prescriptions, especially when people fall in the donut hole. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) enrollees includes provisions to minimize the size of the donut hole but it did not eliminate it all together. According to this EBRI???s report, by 2020 those enrolled in Medicare will pay 25% of both name brand and generic prescription drugs when they are in the donut hole. In the future you could end up paying a greater percentage due to the financial restraints of Medicare and penny pinching efforts to employment-based retire health programs.

When planning for retirement, out-of-pocket medical expenses should be put into the budget. Costs for prescription costs alone can set some people back quite a bit. According to EBRI???s findings based on median drug prices if a man retired at age 65 in 2014 he ???would need $64,000 in savings and a woman would need $83,00 if each had a goal of having a 50% chance of having enough money saved to cover health expenses in retirement.?? The savings total for women is higher due to their longer life expectancy.

One free solution that the Indiana Association of Cities and Towns would like to remind their members about is the Indiana Drug Card. The Indiana Drug card is a free prescription assistance program available to all Hoosiers with no age or income requirements. Although many routine medications may be covered by Medicare, it is always worth shopping around to see if there is a better rate through a program like this. When an individual falls in their donut hole they can use this program to help offset the costs of high price prescriptions. To print a free card or check the price of your medication using the Indiana Drug Card, go to www.IndianaDrugCard.com. For questions call 1-888-4-IDNY-RX or email natalie@indianadrugcard.com


“Children's Miracle Network Hospitals Ad: Pharmacy Times (May 2016)”

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Pharmacy Times (May 2016)

A Children's Miracle Network Hospitals ad was featured in Pharmacy Times (May 2016 Issue). A donation will be made to your local Children's Miracle Network Hospital each time a prescription is processed through the Rx Assistance Program.

Pharmacy Times (May 2016)


“Indiana Drug Card ad featured in Medical Group Management Association Newsletter (March 2017)”

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MGMA Newsletter (March 2017)

The Pulse is the official newsletter of the Indiana Medical Group Management Association. An Indiana Drug Card article and advertisement was featured in the March 2017 Indiana Medical Group Management Association Newsletter.

MGMA Newsletter (March 2017)


“Prescription Cards for Fishers Residents”

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Fishers Town Talk December 2011

pdf Fishers Town Talk (December 2011) page 6

Thanks to the Indiana Drug Card and the Indiana Association of Cities and Towns, Fishers residents now have access to a free discount prescription drug card.

There are no membership restrictions, income requirements, age limitations or applications to fill out. Cardholders can see savings of up to 75% on prescription drugs and the card is accepted at over 56,000 pharmacies across the country.

The free Fishers prescription drug card program was launched to help residents to afford their prescription drugs. This program can be utilized by any Fishers resident, regardless of their current insurance coverage. Those who are uninsured, underinsured or whose insurance does not include prescription benefits (this is common in many health savings accounts and high deductible health plans) can take advantage of this card for discounted costs on non-formulary or non-covered drugs.

To get your free discount prescription drug card visit one of the following locations: Fishers Town Hall, Fishers Police department reception desk and vehicles, Fishers Fire department reception desk and ambulances or the Fishers Train Station.

This opportunity is being funded through the participation of pharmacies and pharmaceutical companies throughout the country.

For more information on the program contact Natalie Meyer, Program Coordinator, at Natalie@indrugcard.com or 888-446-3979.


“Prescription drug card available to Clark residents.”

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(Jeffersonville) – Indiana residents are being offered a way to save money on their prescription drugs.

Jeffersonville Mayor Tom Galligan announced Tuesday that a prescription drug card that can reduce consumer costs at many pharmacies is available to Clark County residents at City Hall and other locations in Jeffersonville.

"This is something simple we can offer at no cost to the city or the consumer" to help lower medical costs for the public, Galligan said.

The discount program is provided in Indiana through the Indiana Association of Cities and Towns, Jeffersonville insurance agent Edward Culpepper "Pepper" Cooper said at a press conference at Jeffersonville City Hall.

It often provides discounts of 30 percent off retail costs for prescription drugs at participating pharmacies, including CVS, Kroger, Meijer, Rite Aid, Target, Walgreens, Walmart and others, the city said in a press release.

Cooper said it can benefit residents who don't have insurance and those with high-deductible insurance, since it can reduce their out-of-pocket costs for prescription medicines. It won't be of much use for those who have health insurance that includes good prescription drug benefits, Cooper said.

The cards are accepted at about 56,000 pharmacies across the county, the city said.

In the next few weeks, Jeffersonville will mail a newsletter to its residents that will include a page with the discount card printed on it, as well as an explanation, Cooper said. The postage -- about $3,600 -- will be paid by the Neace Lukens Maverick Insurance Agency, for which Cooper works.

The card simply requires a name and a phone number to be written on it, and when presented at a participating pharmacy, a discount will be offered.

The card says that the program is not insurance but simply a "point-of-sale discount plan" in which participating pharmacies offer certain discounts, which the pharmacies determine themselves.

"It's a win-win situation," Galligan said, explaining that the discount program saves consumers money at no cost to the city or state and helps the participating pharmacies' marketing.

The cards are available on the Jeffersonville website, www.cityofjeff.net, at the sewer billing office in City Hall, 500 Quartermaster Court, and they soon will be at the city's five fire stations. They are available to all Clark County residents.


“Free Rx card can save folks up to 75 percent on prescriptions”

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Dunelanders now have access to a free discount prescription drug card, the Chesterton Town Manager's Office announced in a statement released on Thursday.

The Chesterton Rx Card is being offered to all residents compliments of the Indiana Drug Card and the Indiana Association of Cities and Towns (IACT). The free drug card provides savings up to 75 perccent on prescription drugs and is accepted at over 56,000 pharmacies across the country.

This program has no restrictions to membership, no income requirements, no age limitations, and there are no applications to fill out.

"The Chesterton Rx Card was launched to help uninsured and underinsured residents afford their prescription medications," the statement said. "However, the program can also be used by people who have health insurance coverage with no prescription benefits, which is common in many health savings accounts (HSA) and high deductible health plans. Additionally, people who have prescription coverage can use this program for non-formulary or non-covered drugs."

Folks can obtain one of these cards by visiting www.chestertonin.org and clicking on the "Chesterton Rx Card" link. People who are unable to access the internet may obtain a card at the Chesterton/Duneland Chamber of Commerce, 220 Broadway; Chesterton Town Hall, 726 Broadway; or the Chesterton Municipal Complex, 1490 Broadway.

The Chesterton Rx Card, compliments of the Indiana Drug Card is being funded through the participation of pharmacies and pharmaceutical companies.

"We encourage all residents to take advantage of the opportunity to help offset the rising costs of prescription drugs purchased in Indiana," said IACT Executive Director Matthew C. Greller. "The Indiana Drug Card is open to all residents and everyone should be able to benefit from this program at some point."


“Crown Point finding ways to cut health care costs”

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(Crown Point) – Health and workers compensation insurance costs for the city are on the decline, bucking national trends of climbing rates.

During a special meeting Thursday the Board of Works and Public Safety approved 2012 contracts for both insurances representing a 15 percent decrease in health care insurance costs and an 11 percent decrease in workers compensation costs.

"The trend is at a 14 percent increase (for health insurance). You guys have decreased instead of increased," said Dana Culpepper Cooper of Maverick Insurance, the city's agent.

She said the company looked at four different carriers for the city and ended up staying with the current provider which offered the best rates. The city, which is partially self-insured, was able to reduce its maximum exposure to claims by $728,000.

Kelly Zullo of Neace Lukens, which represents the city for workers compensation, said the same trends hold true for workers compensation insurance.

City initiatives such as the creation of a safety committee and manual and implementation of a return to work police policy have helped the city shave on insurance costs.

"We continue to see a significant improvement year over year," she said.

In a separate move officials also announced a new prescription drug benefit card available at no cost to all city employees and Crown Point residents.

Mayor David Uran said the city has partnered with the Indiana Association of Cities and Towns and the Indiana Drug Card to offer a free discount prescription drug card to residents of the city and surrounding area.

Beginning Friday residents will be able to log onto the city's website and apply for the card.

There are no restrictions to membership. Discounts of up to 75 percent are available on medications for the uninsured or underinsured.


“Indiana Drug Card - FREE”

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Indianapolis Medical Society Bulletin Cover June 2012 Indianapolis Medical Society Bulletin (June 2012)

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS:

The cards are FREE to all Indiana residents.

There are no enrollment forms, no restrictions, no age or income requirements, no waiting periods, no eligibility required, no exclusions, covers pre-existing conditions, no claim forms to file, no annual or lifetime limits, includes discounts on brand and generic medications, open formulary so that brand and generic medications are eligible for discounts.

This program has a "LOWEST PRICE" feature that provides cardholders the lowest plan price on prescriptions at participating pharmacies (Medication Pricing/Discounts are calculated on the plan's lowest negotiated contract price and the pharmacy's "usual and customary" price).

This Program can be used by people who have Health Savings Accounts (HSAs), High Deductible Plans, and Medicare Part D.

The program can be used as a standalone benefit or to get discounts on non-covered drugs.

All Indiana residents are eligible to participate in this program.

To optain a FREE card access www.IndianaDrugCard.com 24 hours a day and download as many cards as needed.

If patients do not have access to a computer, patients can walk into ANY CVS to receive the discount through the Indiana Drug Card program


“CHC Digest - Indiana Drug Card”

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IPHCA CHC Digest, Issue 32

The Indiana Drug Card is the official statewide free prescription assistance program available to all residents within the state of Indiana. It was created in 2009 to help the uninsured and under-insured with the cost of necessary medication and can be used by those with insurance coverage to help with the cost for any uncovered medications. This program can also be used as a Medicare Part D supplement by providing discounts on non-covered drugs and covering those in the donut hole.

It is reported by the Indiana Drug Card Program that the average cost savings is 30%-35% with some medications covered up to 75%. There are no enrollment forms or requirements to be eligible for this program. If you feel this card would be beneficial to your patients and you would like to display them in your facility you can contact Natalie Meyer at Natalie@indrugcard.com or (317) 650-7447 for more information.

Further details of the program can be found here and here.


“City helps with Prescriptions”

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City Helps With Prescriptions

Kokomo residents who have trouble finding money in their budget for their prescription medications will be relieved to hear that the city has found a solution that could help. Residents of Kokomo and the surrounding areas now have access to a free discount prescription drug card.

The Kokomo Rx Card - and the offshoot of the popular Indiana Drug Card - is now available.

In conjunction with the Indiana Association of cities and towns, the city is providing the free drug card, which can result in savings up to 75 percent on prescription drugs, and is accepted at over 60,000 pharmacies across the country.

The Kokomo Rx Card and Indiana Drug Card have named CVS Pharmacy as their preferred pharmacy, but card holders may use any of the participating service providers. There are no restrictions to membership for the Kokomo Rx Card, no income requirements, no age limitations, and no applications to fill out and anyone can use the card.

The Kokomo Rx Card was launched to help uninsured and underinsured residents afford their prescription medications. But the card can be used by anyone, including residents who have health insurance coverage with no prescription benefits, which is common in many health savings accounts (HSA) and high deductable health plans.

Additionally, people who have prescription coverage can use this program for non-formulary or non-covered drugs.

The Kokomo Rx Card can be obtained by visiting www.cityofkokomo.org and clicking on the Kokomo Rx Card link. People who are unable at access the internet may obtain a card by visiting the following places:

City Hall at the Welcome Center in the main lobby
City Line Trolley Dispatcher Center
Kokomo Senior Citizens Center
Gilead House
The Center Township Trustee's Office

The Kokomo Rx Card and the Indiana Drug Card are funded through the participating of pharmacies and pharmaceutical companies. The Indiana Association of Cities and Towns (IACT), is working with the program to create awareness:

"We encourage all residents to take advantage of the opportunity to help offset the rising costs of prescription drugs purchased in Indiana," said IACT Executive Director Matthew C. Greller. "The Indiana Drug Card is open to all residents and everyone should be able to benefit from this program at some point."


“Drug Discount Program Offered”

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Drug Discount Program Offered

By DANETTE M. WATT
For the HJ

There's a little-known discount drug card program the Monticello mayor's office wants you to know about. The Prescription Assistance Program offers an average of 30 percent discount on prescription drug costs - at pharmacies large and small.

Chris McWhirter, Mayor Ken Houston's assistant, heard about the program at a conference he attended this spring.

"I thought it would be great to offer our citizens. It seemed like a really good deal," he said. "A lot of people might think it's for the uninsured, but anyone can use it."

About 68 cities in Indiana offer the card program, which launched in July 2009.

There are similar programs in each state, and the card can be used at any of the 56,000 national and regional pharmacies around the country.

"So many people are struggling to pay for their medicines," said Natalie Meyer, program coordinator for Indiana. "Some of the stories are really hard to hear. It's nice to know there's help."

Meyer said the program is not just for the uninsured or underinsured. New employees waiting for benefits to kick in, and those with high deductibles could also benefit.

The program's parent company, United Networks of America based in Baton Rouge, La., initiated the program in part to encourage people to visit their local pharmacies, rather than buy medicines online, Meyer said.

"There are reasons for shopping locally. First, it keeps pharmacists employed and supports local businesses. But also, your pharmacist can warn you if two drugs won't interact well, and give you other advice about your drugs. And you know where the drugs are coming from (unlike buying online)," she said. "It's very community oriented."

To use the card, people need to fill in and print a card from the site's homepage, www.indianadrugcard.com. There's also an app for mobile devices.

Meyer said all information is confidential.

"The only person who will see your information is the pharmacist, and he's going to have it anyway," she said.

The program may not benefit everyone, said McWhirter, but, "they can take the card along with their insurance card to find out which gives them the better deal."

Meyer said some savings might be, "just $2 but it all adds up. If you saw $2 on the ground, wouldn't you pick it up?"

Not all pharmacies charge the same price for the same drug, so it pays to shop around, Meyer said. Indiana's website has a medication pricing page. Type the drug name and your ZIP code, and the website will offer a list of pharmacies and an estimate of the cost for that particular drug.

"There's been about $32 million saved so far," Meyer said.

Meyer encourages people to call her if they need help with the program, or if they have questions.

One can call 317-650-7447 or email her at Natalie@indianadrugcard.com.